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The best relationship is with sports, because all sports can do is make you a better, stronger, person

January 23rd, 2013 by Tom

Wrestling Relationship

You learn confidence. You learn self-control. You learn to stand on your own while also, learning, teamwork. You learn so much by participating in any sport that every kid should join a sport at some point; even if it's, just, for the social skills.

Single leg

December 29th, 2012 by Tom

Going for the takedown.

via instagram

Tulare California to consider 16,000-seat arena

January 2nd, 2012 by Tom

California USA Wrestling's Rob Valeiro has asked the city of Tulare to share the cost of a study to determine whether the 16,000-seat arena and sports complex the organization is proposing is feasible for northeast Tulare.

Valeiro said the study, with a cost estimated between $52,500 and $80,000, will document the project's economic impact in the community.

"It'll tell us what we can build. Is it feasible? What can be supported in the region and what kind of impact it'll make on job creation."

A Southern California Edison study prepared in March stated that the arena, to be built on Hillman Street south of Cartmill Avenue, would create about 1,000 temporary jobs during construction and up to 300 permanent jobs when it opens. The jobs include arena management positions and support staff.

California USA Wrestling's Rob Valeiro has asked the city of Tulare to share the cost of a study to determine whether the 16,000-seat arena and sports complex the organization is proposing is feasible for northeast Tulare.

Valeiro said the study, with a cost estimated between $52,500 and $80,000, will document the project's economic impact in the community.

"It'll tell us what we can build. Is it feasible? What can be supported in the region and what kind of impact it'll make on job creation."

A Southern California Edison study prepared in March stated that the arena, to be built on Hillman Street south of Cartmill Avenue, would create about 1,000 temporary jobs during construction and up to 300 permanent jobs when it opens. The jobs include arena management positions and support staff.

"Those are real numbers, "Valeiro said.

The project will be a way of showing that Tulare is taking job-creating matters into its own hands, Valeiro said.

"We don't want to wait for someone to hand us a way to get people back to work, "he said. "We want to create it right here in Tulare."

Valeiro said an arena like the one being proposed would host about 100 events a year. Already, USA Wrestling has committed 89 events a year, including high school championship meets, he said. "That's huge for us, "he said.

The arena will be the permanent home for USA Wrestling, a nonprofit organization seeking to promote and preserve collegiate and international styles of amateur wrestling.

Estimates indicate that a three-day event could draw up to 7,000 visitors to Tulare, Valeiro said. The arena would also host concerts, recitals, tractor-pull competitions and monster truck demonstrations, while the convention center portion could host seminars and workshops.

Hosting those events would create added revenue for the city.

Tulare Redevelopment Director Bob Nance said visitors attending events buy gas at local stations, stay at local hotels and eat at restaurants in addition to what they pay to get into an event."That's like Disneyland, "he said.

Nance said the proposed arena is unusual because it includes commercial and public aspects.

Besides the arena, the project includes retail and corporate offices, a hotel and conference center.

In total, the project would take up 27 acres in northeast Tulare, Valeiro said.

Additional details on the facility include:

  • Estimated building area of 500,000 square feet.
  • Estimated floor space of 84,000 square feet.
  • 11,000 floor seats.
  • 27,000 total seat capacity.
  • 32, luxury, suites.
  • 200-seat restaurant with views of the arena.

Target opening date is Feb. 1, 2015.

But before a partnership can be considered, project proponents must give a thorough presentation to the City Council, Nance said. That's part of a newly adopted council policy.

The council is expected to address the policy at its Jan. 17 meeting. A presentation on the project could be made at the same meeting, Nance said.

Generally, a feasibility study takes 60 days to complete, Nance said

Website will help lure amateur sports in Minnesota

September 25th, 2011 by Tom

By Ben Boldt

Sports marketing is getting some attention from the state department of tourism, Explore Minnesota. In a few weeks a new segment to the www.exploreminnesota.com Website will launch. It will be all about sports.

The goal of this new initiative is to present Minnesota as an amateur sports destination. It will list many of the venues from across the state in an easy-to-navigate way for any organization interested in hosting an event in Minnesota. The listings will include venue details, contact information, photos and videos. The site will integrate some of Minnesota's most popular attractions to the page so the viewer can get a more complete idea of what Minnesota has to offer. The Rochester Amateur Sports Commission has already done the legwork of gathering venue data from our area of the state and submitting it to this project.

Along with the new presence on the Website, sports will also gain some marketing power in other areas. Minnesota cities will have an opportunity to co-op with the state in their sales and marketing efforts. The agency is also looking to have a presence at sports event conferences that the RASC already attends like the National Association of Sports Commissions Symposium and the TEAMS Conference. This will hopefully lead to more exposure and interaction with the national governing bodies and their staff members who select host cities for their events.

We have seen this type of unified state marketing for a few years at the conferences we attend. Other states have achieved this objective in a wide array of ways such as giving cities access to marketing resources and awarding monetary grants to cities that bring in new events to the state. Minnesota is planning to use some of these ideas to help cities in their pursuit of sports travel business.

The Sports Commission is excited to see how this new initiative can help us be more successful. After all, the bottom line is that when the cities of Minnesota are successful the state economy will feel the positive effects.

Upcoming events:
MN Youth Soccer Fall State Tournament: October 14-16
Exchange Club Volleyball Tournament: October 21-22
Intermat JJ Wrestling Classic: October 21-23

College Sports Council releases new study

July 5th, 2009 by Tom

COLLEGE SPORTS COUNCIL

New Study of Gender Symmetric Teams Reveals Significant Disparity in Athletic Opportunities at Division I Level

37 Years After Passage of Title IX, the College Sports Council Calls on NCAA to Equalize Scholarship Limits

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The preliminary findings of a study of NCAA participation and scholarship data conducted by the College Sports Council (CSC) shows that in gender symmetrical sports, which have teams for both male and female athletes, women are accorded far more opportunities to compete and earn scholarships at NCAA Division 1 schools, the highest level of intercollegiate athletics.

"After nearly four decades after the passage of Title IX, it's time to erase all institutional gender discrimination, and that includes bias against boys, "said CSC Chairman Eric Pearson.

"Current NCAA policies cultivate the disparity between male and female scholarship opportunities. In sports where there are symmetric teams the scholarship limits should be the same. The CSC calls on the NCAA to equalize scholarship limits in all sports which have teams for both male and female athletes."

Later this Summer, the CSC will release a comprehensive study on athletic opportunity in NCAA Division I in "gender symmetric "sports where both men and women compete. Preliminary findings of this study include:

  • At the NCAA Division I level, there are far more women s teams (2,653) than men s teams (2,097), denying thousands of male athletes the opportunity to compete.
  • Overall in "gender symmetric "sports, there are far more scholarships available for women (32,656) than for men (20,206).
  • By far, the most difficult athletic scholarship to obtain at the Division I level is in men's volleyball, where there are 489 high school athletes for every full NCAA scholarship.

Research Note: The underlying data from this study was obtained from the NCAA ("1981-82-2006-07 NCAA Sports Sponsorship and Participation Rate Report "and "2006-07 NCAA Division I Manual") and the National Federation of State High School Associations using the 2006-07 academic year as a common baseline. The figure for maximum number of scholarships available was obtained by multiplying the number of Division I teams in which both men and women compete ("gender symmetric") by the scholarship limits set out by the NCAA in the 2006-07 Division I Manual. Please note, not all NCAA institutions fully fund their programs to the NCAA scholarship limit, so this number is a theoretical maximum. For example, Ivy League institutions do not award athletic scholarships, though most athletes at those institutions do receive some form of financial aid. The final chart, "The Long Odds Against Athletic Scholarships, "was calculated by dividing the number of high school participants by the maximum number of scholarships available.

The College Sports Council is a national coalition of coaches, parents, athletes and alumni.

Additional Background: http://www.collegesportscouncil.org/

NCAA Asks Schools Not to Blame Title IX

December 29th, 2008 by Tom

As a number of athletic departments prepare to cut some men's teams to trim budgets, NCAA president Myles Brand has put out a call for schools to leave Title IX out of it. He has pre-emptively asked schools with shrinking athletic programs to blame the economic downturn for their problems"and not the federal law that bans sex discrimination at schools and requires institutions to maintain a commitment to women's sports, USA Today reports.

"My expectation is that over the next year or two we are going to see more "cuts of men's teams, Brand said this week in a telephone interview, "and so I am trying, frankly, to pre-empt the argument against Title IX, an unfair argument, I believe, and dissuade universities from going public with this approach."

Brand mentioned James Madison and Rutgers , schools that cut teams in 2006-07, and Delaware , where cuts have been discussed, as examples.

"I think they need to be honest about it. Any cuts at this point in sports are certainly going to be tied to financial pressures, "said Brand, who urged schools not to drop any teams, men's or women's.

"I would suggest that athletics directors need to spend more smartly, "he said, suggesting cutting costs in travel, facilities, and "expenditures in the highly visible sports."

Agile Wrestler Kicks Ass – Must See Video

February 25th, 2008 by Tom

I've seen good wrestling matches in the past, but this kid is the champ. Check out his amazing move that gets him the pin!

This is something you have to see to believe.

Agile Wrestler Kicks Ass

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WOW!

Naismith: “Wrestling Is Better Exercise Than Basketball”

December 30th, 2007 by Tom

James Naismith was born in Canada and graduated from McGill University and the Presbyterian seminary in Toronto. In 1890 he entered the YMCA college in Springfield, Massachusetts, and it was there that James Naismith invented basketball, using peach baskets as the goal.

Designed as something different that could be played indoors with a limited number of players, basketball was an immediate success with the Springfield students. By the turn of the century several schools in the east had begun intercollegiate competition. From Springfield, Naismith went to Denver where he acquired a medical degree which qualified him to join the University of Kansas faculty as a physical education professor and chaplain. He remained in Lawrence until his death in 1939.

Dr. Naismith regarded his invention of the game as just an episode in a long career devoted to the improvement of the physical condition of succeeding generations. He thought wrestling was better exercise than basketball and one reporter said he drew as much pleasure from watching gymnasts as he did from K.U. basketball. When one of his former students, Forrest "Phog "Allen, told him he was going to Baker University to coach basketball Naismith said, "Why, basketball is just a game to play. It doesn't need a coach."

In 1936, the first year basketball was included in Olympic competition, money was raised to send Naismith to Berlin so that he could see his game played internationally. When he returned he commented that seeing the game played by many nations was the greatest compensation he could have received for his invention.

Dr. Naismith's basketball rules took one page and less than 600 words. Today, there are more than 30,000 words in the rules.